Chelsea’s Magdalena Eriksson: ‘In England, we don’t see white skin at all’

Written by Staff Writer Written by Staff Writer When Chelsea’s goalsman, Jess Carter, and women’s football legend Magdalena Eriksson, talked about recent controversies surrounding racial segregation in football, they didn’t mean to single out…

Chelsea's Magdalena Eriksson: 'In England, we don't see white skin at all'

Written by Staff Writer

Written by Staff Writer

When Chelsea’s goalsman, Jess Carter, and women’s football legend Magdalena Eriksson, talked about recent controversies surrounding racial segregation in football, they didn’t mean to single out the most recent England captain, Harry Kane.

“The English are in my opinion the most racist country in the world,” said Eriksson. “The black man is not wanted in the English football system.”

She added: “They take children from Africa and put them in state boarding schools, that have negative influence.”

Humans of New York (HONY) contributor Jess Carter said the reason why people find racial segregation so offensive is because, “In England, we don’t see white skin at all.”

Admitting that “we suffer racism in England,” as “your parents were recently robbed,” Carter said that he himself had suffered. “When I was a boy, I was subjected to monkey noises, taunts, racial epithets, and you’re 11 years old, it’s something that happens and you’re not going to stop.”

“There are ways to not be called a monkey, and that’s the benefit of going through school and learning manners. But for kids today, who are more aware that they’re not white, they don’t use the word because it’s derogatory.”

The issue of racism in English football was raised last week when Harry Kane was photographed in a crowd of players taking a knee in the Wembley Stadium pre-match warm-up, ahead of England’s match against Switzerland, in protest of the apparent abuse that he received during the World Cup.

Did Harry Kane have anything to do with this? There are plenty of claims and counter-claims in the aftermath of the story, so here’s a closer look at the situation.

As Carter put it, black footballers like Kane have to find ways to endure abuse that white players never have to.

Carter, however, had only kind words for Harry Kane and his fellow England captain. “Harry’s a good lad,” he said. “He hasn’t been doing it for publicity or anything.”

Those words might be shared by Chelsea coach Maurizio Sarri, who believes that black players are better than their white counterparts.

When asked about racial discrimination and the treatment of Kane, he said, “a lot of clubs in England, on behalf of the federation, should pay more money to black players.”

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