Five things people like you should know about policing on the subway

Massive police interventions on the subway routinely involve gestures and threats by the officer towards bystanders, including children and elders. In recent weeks, young men have been caught on video punching officers as they…

Five things people like you should know about policing on the subway

Massive police interventions on the subway routinely involve gestures and threats by the officer towards bystanders, including children and elders. In recent weeks, young men have been caught on video punching officers as they were strapped to their seats. On Friday, a video showed a similar scene, only the officers were not charged with crimes in the video.

According to the New York Police Department, within the past six months, officers were issued more than two thousand summonses for subway spats. They also deal with between 150 and 200 crimes occurring on the subway per day.

So why are police spending so much time just scuffling with passengers? At least some of the problem is the result of of the start of a new initiative that has police responding to crimes committed or suspicious situations by subway riders.

More cops on trains brings with it a difference in public perception, mainly because police officers have to make an often split-second decision based on a very limited amount of information, as was the case with these train riders. Some officers would argue that because video footage exists of incidents including both consensual and police-generated, people often believe that the police would simply allow such incidents to happen if there were more officers around.

In any case, the lack of evidence behind the reckless accusations and violent behavior of passengers against the police is not something a black police officer with a few years in the force should have to worry about.

Leave a Comment