How pro gamers have started protecting themselves from government scrutiny

Written by Staff Writer Gamers can post some of the coolest videos and pictures on the Internet, such as more than 1 million people in New York’s Times Square who will actually go out…

How pro gamers have started protecting themselves from government scrutiny

Written by Staff Writer

Gamers can post some of the coolest videos and pictures on the Internet, such as more than 1 million people in New York’s Times Square who will actually go out of their way to watch esports event Twitch streamers.

It’s this kind of “real world” appeal that tournaments founders are looking to cash in on. But it can be a dilemma for some esports teams, who are subject to more legal scrutiny than their traditional team sport counterparts.

When Prodigal Sons Gaming head coach Mike Scalzi got an offer from a company called Live Our Gaming, he immediately saw the opportunity to get in on the fast-growing esports market.

According to Scalzi, the team already had the equipment and the infrastructure to become an official player, but there was just one issue – the team’s driver’s license.

Play of the day, just one month after gaming team Prodigal Sons Gaming won the Best League Championship trophy for League of Legends

“He sent me an email, I never even asked for my driver’s license to get the license and there was no hesitation whatsoever,” Scalzi said.

While being a professional esports player is no easy feat, Scalzi’s decision to gain legal protection for the team he had just acquired caused a media frenzy.

Prodigal Sons Gaming was the only team to request all of its players receive legal protection from an independent law firm, Live Our Gaming, as early as July.

Prodigal Sons Gaming player Bram le Blondel is one of the team’s attorneys.

Live Our Gaming Managing Partner Todd Singer said the law firm was able to help the team when it realized they were confused about the wording of the state driver’s license law.

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