How royal fans would order the perfect cocktail

BBC News She must start with that, isn’t she? Some may argue it’s more refined than the average cocktail. The crown jewels have been a drink staple since the days of Louis XV, and…

How royal fans would order the perfect cocktail

BBC News

She must start with that, isn’t she? Some may argue it’s more refined than the average cocktail.

The crown jewels have been a drink staple since the days of Louis XV, and more recently for generations of royalty — the British royal family included. But it isn’t been so long since the Queen has participated in the drinking game, “What drink should the Queen have now?”

Radio and television host Chris Evans questioned the soon-to-be-90-year-old royal about her favourite tipple. In a bid to provoke a response, he literally brought a gin and tonic out of the cupboard.

“You should bring a gin and tonic because your liking of cocktails may fade with age,” said Evans, “but you have a pot of gin and tonic. You should have an old classic now.”

The Queen — and the nation — laughed knowingly at his suggestion, but she still had to try the beverage. She then revealed that the rules of the game are simple:

In a 1998 documentary called “Royal Palate” and accompanied by a series of public services, the Queen conducted a fascinating look at the chemistry behind her favourite gins.

When she’s finished tasting the drinks — including what has become known as the “Cambridge gin”, a blend of juniper berry, wheat and citrus — she’s free to dictate which one she’ll like next. And the choice, as it turns out, is based on “barrel strength” alone.

“I suppose it says a lot about the way we drink now that the Queen is dropping ginsmiths’ egos like cucumber sandwiches in a straightforward refutation of botanical palates,” Evans wrote.

He added that the “obvious object” of the drinking game is to guess which one the Queen wants next — choosing a gin you didn’t choose yourself. We wonder if it has anything to do with the light-as-a-feather Tim Page.

To be fair, the queen has a good reason for ordering gin from a bar instead of a bottle of rasp. Gin is a regulated and vetted drink, it’s taxed just like wine and of course the Queen has a duty to the crown. It’s alcohol and from now on her budget will be based on that.

But why the mix of gin and tonic when you could have had the Crown Jewels? Does a good gin and tonic mean the end of history, the start of a new era of good taste? Don’t be daft, we’ll still be picking our food from the royals’ kitchen.

And the Queen has some advice on how to order the perfect drink, too.

Chris Evans had you laughing in tribute to the Queen, you all, so let’s do it one better. Take this line: “Sippin’ it on white will help the hangover.” Let’s face it, they drink that in prison, so surely if you do it here — at one with the world — it’s going to taste even better?

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