Sisters found ‘stuck together’ in bus stop aren’t triplets or twins

news Three sisters found at a bus stop with their heads stuck together were not actually triplets or twins. Family members and police said the three women were Romanian twins in Toronto when they…

Sisters found 'stuck together' in bus stop aren't triplets or twins

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Three sisters found at a bus stop with their heads stuck together were not actually triplets or twins.

Family members and police said the three women were Romanian twins in Toronto when they were born at Sick Kids Hospital on the date August 25.

But experts don’t know if any of the sisters are actually identical triplets or twins, pointing to “very little information” about triplets and twins.

Identical triplets, which the hospital treats when three different girls born at the same time, are born as three eggs, with two running in parallel to each other. For identical twins to be twins, each has one egg that splits evenly with the other.

Demosthenes Sorancim, an adjunct professor at the University of Guelph’s Faculty of Nursing and co-director of the polytechnic lab of congenital anatomy and physiology, told CBC News he could not recall an identical twins case in the last 10 years.

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It’s unclear when the sisters arrived at the hospital. If they were twins, it would have been an average of 200 to 300 days from conception, before a cesarean section. Sorancim says twins typically live in the womb for about one to two months and are born still with their heads stuck together.

He says twins or even triplets typically live for around two weeks, are delivered still attached, go into surgery and then have surgery to release them. Twins and triplets are usually delivered surgically and six months later are expected to survive.

“It’s fascinating, I know, but there’s nothing I have seen in the past 10 years that this would be an identical twin case,” Sorancim told CBC News.

Toronto police told CBC they aren’t doing much more with the case. “I don’t think this is going to change the fact that we can’t identify them,” Detective Liana Norton said.

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